Faith of Our Fathers

  • “…This crisis is necessary for the purification of the Church. God is allowing that evil spirit to come to the surface. This is both the prelude of a storm that will bring the Church very close to the point of sinking, and also the sign that a great era of the Church will dawn after the storm has passed. Our orders are to stay on board and trust. Evil shall not prevail.”

  • “…it’s a great paradox that, for all its advocacy of killing, the culture of death really doesn’t like to look death straight in the eye… With the ever-growing popularity of cremation what, indeed, has happened to the funeral? Funerals used to be about the dead. Death interrupted life. People found out about a death and went to a wake. Funerals upset schedules. But, with technology (morgue freezers, embalming, cremation), death suddenly no longer has urgency. We can put off the funeral until the weekend – or until it’s convenient for a quorum of the family. Since we often bringing a box of ashes to the funeral that requires our imagination to see this as a person, the funeral has turned from real, physical mortality to mental memories… how does the whole process subtly contribute to a decay of faith? Isn’t the cumulative effect a babbling about “going to a better place” and “he’s at peace” (whatever that means) suggest a hazy belief in the afterlife? Isn’t this what Josef Ratzinger meant by ‘silent apostasy,’…”

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  • “…I also console myself with the thought that the official teachings of the Church, despite the apparent wishes of some German bishops, remain true to the teachings of the Apostles, the Fathers of the Church, and the Doctors of the Church. The Nicene Creed has not been openly repudiated. And I especially console myself with the thought that the theology of the Church has for many centuries borne a strongly Aristotelian flavor. This is of course particularly true of the theology of Thomas Aquinas (1225-74)… if I’m somebody who believes that truth is not a thing of value for its own sake, then it will be quite logical…to conclude that lies are allowable provided these lies seem likely to produce beneficial results. Soviet Russia and Nazi Germany have been the most striking examples of that kind of “utilitarian” lying…one of the reasons I hope Catholicism soon recovers from its present corruption – so that the world will once again be safe for at least a few Aristotelians, people who believe in truth for its own sake.”

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  • “…The chants of the traditional ( #Latin ) Mass for the Dead, called by the first word of the Mass proper, #Requiem , include some of the Church’s most ancient, solemn, and moving. They express the seriousness, the gravity of death, and seek God’s mercy for those who have died. It was shocking to many when the Dies Irae and other chants were removed from the Mass for the Dead in the liturgical reform that followed the Second Vatican Council…The texts of the ancient Mass for the Dead speak of God’s mercy and the gift of salvation, in the context of human guilt and God’s justice…death is a serious thing, both for its effects on the bereaved, of separation from the loved one, and for its effect on the person who has died, who faces judgment… Catholic funerals today all too often refuse to take death seriously. This refusal is not, in fact, the consequence of a true confidence in the afterlife, but is more often a concession to a worldly desire not to confront something that is too frightening, something it desperately wants to control and tidy away out of sight…”

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  • @nicollass Welcome Nicholas. Are you Maronite?

  • “He will come like a thief in the night.”

  • Why we call it “the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass”

  • Article does not exhaust this topic, but provides some useful apologetics: “The perpetual virginity of Our Blessed Mother is frequently disputed by those interested in discrediting the doctrines of the Catholic Church. In this we find an unintended argument to prove the necessity of Mary’s perpetual virginity. It is logical to expect that someone interested in discrediting a kingdom would first try to cast doubts on the virtue of the Queen…”

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    • Hm:

      “In this passage of Ezekiel we see a prophetic type of the Virgin Mary. She is to be visited only by the Holy Spirit, her Spouse, and by the Prince, that is Christ, the Prince of Peace. He is born from her while her virginity is miraculously preserved.”

  • “Protestants sometimes charge Catholics with “vain repetition” in praying the Rosary. This is a reference to Matthew 6:7, where Jesus instructs, “When you pray to not babble with vain repetition as the pagans do.” Sure, when we pray the Rosary there is a lot of repetition. The problem is not repetition but vain repetition. If repetition were the problem Jesus would be have an “Um what about…” moment with Psalm 136 in which every verse ends with “for his mercy endures forever.” No there’s not a problem with repetition was such, but with vain repetition. So what is “vain repetition?”… Vain repetition is repetition without any foundation in meaning or purpose. That’s what Jesus means in the second half of Matthew 6:7 when he says, “They think they are heard because of their many words.”… The Eastern repetitious prayer has the intention and purpose of helping the devotee empty their mind… The Rosary is not an emptying out but a filling up. It is not a forgetting but a remembering…instead of doing so with a meaningless word or phrase it depends on the…Hail Mary…”

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  • “…Why does the Church (and Jesus himself) not concern itself more with the political sphere and try to do good therein?…using Christ as its exemplar—this is simply not its purpose. Christ came primarily to heal our souls, although he did heal bodies along the way. Christ indeed fed the stomachs of the multitude with bread, but he came in order to feed our spirits with the Eucharist. He did not come, as he told Pilate in John 18, to establish a kingdom on earth…Latent in the question is the notion that politics can solve the world’s (and man’s) problems: if we can just refine our laws and customs, we will be able to create a perfect and problem-free society on earth. This is simply not true…The idea that we can be the architects of a utopian society completely ordered towards the good is an exercise in delusional hubris…Our focus, like Christ’s, must not be on this Earth. We are sojourners here, merely passing through…Do not think that any political party or politician will save the United States or the world. Do not put your hope or trust in men. Put your faith in Christ…”

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    • This much is true:

      “In other words, get some proper perspective and don’t let the endlessly noisy and often ugly world of politics disturb your peace. It’s not worth it.”. Thanks for posting.

  • “In the ancient world there were two forms of books: the scroll and the codex… scrolls were long rolls that you had to roll and unroll to read. They had the pages attached side by side to make a long, continuous strip. Codices, by contrast, were like modern books. They had the pages attached at a spine, allowing you to flip from one passage to another. These two types of books amounted to different forms of “book technology.” They worked in different ways, as the ways of accessing the material (rolling vs. flipping) indicates. Before the rise of Christianity, scrolls were by far the most popular format for books. We have almost no references to pre-Christian books being sold in codex form, and pagans and Jews used scrolls almost exclusively when they had scribes copy books for them. By contrast, Christians were enthusiastic users of codices. This is clear from the surviving second and third century Christian manuscripts, the large majority of which are in codex form… Scholars have debated why the codex became so popular among Christians…”

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  • “The #Didache (“Did-ah-KAY”) is a first century manual of Christian instruction, and it provides a fascinating view of life in the early Church…British scholar Alan Garrow has done a lot of work on the Didache, and he has a fascinating hypothesis linking it to Paul’s controversy with the Judaizers in Acts and Galatians…Garrow has provided a fascinating discussion of the Didache and how it might have influenced first century discussions regarding the need for circumcision…The Didache thus remains an important background document, and the light it may shed on the New Testament and its history needs to be further explored.”

  • Pandering to #youth doesn’t work: “This experiment has failed catastrophically…Watching Baby Boomers sing songs that were written in the ‘70s while smacking tambourines… is nobody’s idea of a culturally relevant experience…The way we present the message of Jesus should be like nothing of this world, because it’s not of this world…it should have a quality of other worldliness and transcendence. That’s why the Church has always made this distinction between the sacred and the profane…”

  • ”…The vast majority of Gen Xers and Millennials have never taken a course in #Logic . The vast majority of people writing or presenting websites using multi-media have not studied Logic. This includes well-meaning people who either only look at one side of arguments, or fall into emotional presentations of serious subjects. What is happening is that the Church is being divided by sloppy thinking. In all times of crises, rational discourse is absolutely essential in maintaining balance. The Church is in crisis as we have known for a long time…it does not help #Tradition or #Revelation to fall into emotional responses…the great Doctors of the Church, the Early Church Fathers, the commentators from the Councils, the past wonderful theologians and philosophers, such as Augustine, Anselm, Aquinas, Bellarmine, Liguori, and so on, were all trained in the study of Logic…deep prayer, meditation and contemplation are necessary for clear thinking today…No one who has not studied Logic should be presenting information…”

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    • Rational discourse is needed now more than ever in the age of the internet and cultural globalization. People built this huge network, without giving much thought to the moral or ethical consequences.

      The author states “Sadly, I do not think we shall ever go back to the times of excellent debate and rational discourse.” I am not so pessimistic. We as individuals can lead by example by not resorting to base insults disguised as argument (which seems very common on the web) and engage in actual conversations. We can not change the world in one fell swoop. We can just do our part.

  • Christopher Schaefer posted an update in the group Group logo of Faith of Our FathersFaith of Our Fathers 2 weeks ago

    “…The #priesthood as we know it today is not a strong motif in the New Testament. But this can be explained in terms of development of doctrine: some things were understood only in very basic or skeletal terms in the early days of Christianity. This is even true of doctrines accepted by all, such as the Holy #Trinity or original sin. The canon of the biblical books was slow to formulate (four centuries)… one can still find much evidence in the Bible of a Christian priesthood…Protestants sometimes cite 1 Peter 2:5, 9 to the effect that all Christians are priests. But Peter was citing Exodus 19:6: “you shall be to me a kingdom of priests and a holy nation.” The problem is that the older passage couldn’t possibly have meant that there was no priesthood among the ancient Hebrews, since they clearly had a separate class of priests…Exodus 19:21-24 twice contrasts “priests” and “people.” Thus, it makes much more sense to interpret 1 Peter 2:5 as meaning a separate, holy, “chosen” class of priests…”

  • Christopher Schaefer posted an update in the group Group logo of Faith of Our FathersFaith of Our Fathers 2 weeks ago

    “…There is a tendency in some corners of the Church today to do “catchphrase theology,” to lean on words and phrases which sound positive and produce a warm feeling, but lack much definition or substance…words like “discernment” and “accompaniment” remain opaque to most of us… controversial issues are raised, a call for clarity follows, only to get lost in the fog of these terms…certain figures in the Church call for “updated language,” “deeper reflection,” and “putting things in terms of today,” only to find the texts produced by those same people to be constructed out of impenetrable sociological argot…taking key phrases from the Church’s teaching tradition, isolating them, and imposing upon them a new and very different definition…to introduce novel interpretations of traditional teaching so as to insert questionable ideas…the content diluted to the point where it can mean anything. You can’t help wondering… what sorts of sins cannot be “discerned” into acceptability or “accompanied” into respectability…”

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  • “…As bishops came out and began to address #Vigano and the crisis…Many seemed more interested in their public image and careers than the toll their incredulity was having on the Church…The fact is, though, that this whole crisis has produced much spiritual fruit in my life. For those who feel ready to throw in the towel, I hope to offer some encouragement…I can control only what I do. Our Lady gave the laity specific instructions at #Fatima, too: pray the #rosary every day, and do #penance in reparation for sin…I have gone back to abstaining from meat and food outside meals on Fridays…the connection between the crisis and the decline in our liturgical sensibilities, so I attended a traditional #Latin Mass…Pray that Christ delivers His Church from its scourges, its mockery, and its cross, which is weighed down by bad shepherds. Pray that Christ protects His Church from a world that would crucify it on the cross of abuse and corruption, if it could. Immaculate Heart of Mary, pray for us.”

  • Quattuor novissima: Mors, Judicii, Caelo et Inferno (The Four Last Things: Death, Judgement, Heaven and Hell)

  • In November–and always #AllSouls

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