Faith of Our Fathers

  • This translation is a bit difficult, but at least read the miracle in “Chapter One: of Honoratus, abbot of the Monastery of Funda”. It’s actually rather funny.

  • Pope St. #Gregory the Great : his exposition on the Book of Job entitled “Moralia”

  • St. Basil the Great: “Only one offense is now vigorously punished — an accurate observance of our fathers’ traditions. For this cause the pious are driven from their countries and transported into deserts. Religious people keep silence, but every blaspheming tongue is let loose” (Ep. 243).

  • Christopher Schaefer posted an update in the group Group logo of Faith of Our FathersFaith of Our Fathers 1 week ago

    “…a general lack of enthusiasm and motivation is a serious symptom of doubts and disbelief affecting parish communities. Thus, we cannot create deeply vibrant, evangelical communities without addressing their apprehension and helping them to fully believe…it will not be easy to get the attention of the lukewarm and absent middle-class while presenting this case. Most will not be interested because life is pretty good and they intuitively believe everyone goes to heaven. I constantly see this presumption of eternal life, especially during eulogies. While I hope to God he will have mercy on us all, this presumption is not consistent with the Gospels and New Testament…Otherwise, as a Church, we’re just offering another feel-good option to people who already feel pretty good, and will therefore continue to shrink. Having said this, we must recognize that helping people appreciate Church moral teaching, and helping them believe in the reality of Satan, fallen angels and hell, can be daunting because some who have not heard this will get upset. But it can be gently done. We only have to be willing to take some heat…” #Evangelization #Apathy

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  • “…Easily the best-known and most celebrated opponent of #Arianism was St. #Athanasius of Alexandria… He knew that Arianism — the crisis of his times — was about not only ideas, but mostly about power and the goods of this world… The crisis of our times, too, is partly about ideas — about truth, and the Faith. Today’s Arians believe that the content of the Faith and the nature and life of the Church can and must evolve over time. They work to revise the Church’s teaching, discipline and message to suit themselves. But they also collude to amass power and the spoils of victory: preferment, privilege, pleasure. They comprise a vast, far-flung network of networks, a super-clique resting its great bulk upon the Catholic world. In this way, and not only in terms of a debate with heterodoxy, faithful Catholics today are involved in a struggle like that of the Fathers in antiquity…”

  • “Since it seems likely that it will be a while before the ‘reform of the reform’ can begin, what now needs to be done is to celebrate the (1969) Novus Ordo in a way that includes as much of the traditional Roman Rite as possible without disobeying its rubrics. The object of this Primer is to inject Tradition into the veins of the Novus Ordo as a preparation for its future reform in the next generation. We hope that these suggestions will fruitfully contribute to the ‘mutual enrichment’ which Pope Benedict spoke of in the motu proprio #SummorumPontificum …”

  • “…as the Church prepares to commemorate the 50th anniversary of #HumanaeVitae in 2018, the recent revelation of a four-member stealth commission to study the document — and other subtle and less subtle attempts to weaken the Church’s moral teaching — are making the concerns of the Church figure at the 2014 synod look ominously prescient…Further evidence can be seen in what appears to be a four-year concerted attempt to marginalize the teachings of Pope St. John Paul II…His teachings ever since formed a bulwark against the dissenters. Most notably they include his 1981 apostolic exhortation Familiaris Consortio (The Role of the Christian Family in the Modern World) and his theology of the body catecheses — both attempts to provide an anthropological foundation and explanation for the encyclical’s teaching. Perhaps even more significant was his 1993 encyclical Veritatis Splendor (The Splendor of Truth), which for the first time presented Catholic moral doctrine in a systematic and formal way, firmly rejecting any relativist interpretation of an intrinsically evil act (an action that is always morally wrong, regardless of its particular circumstances)…”

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  • “…’To a great extent, today’s debates within the Church — on issues of sexual identity, sexual behavior, Communion for the divorced and civilly remarried, the nature of the family — simply exhume and reanimate the convenient ambiguities and flexible approaches to truth that Veritatis Splendor forcefully buried. But the splendor of the truth cannot be hidden. It is ever ancient, ever new. In the long run, Veritatis Splendor will be remembered long after many other works of popes and politicians are forgotten.’… #AmorisLaetitia hoped to avoid the teaching of #VeritatisSplendor altogether. Philadelphia Archbishop Charles #Chaput ’s essay, combined with the 25th anniversary next year, will make that avoidance more difficult to sustain.”

  • “…Pope St. Pius X looms large as a friend and an image of tradition. He is usually seen as a defender of tradition and a great proponent of what today is called the Extraordinary Form (EF) or Traditional #Latin Mass ( #TLM )—so much so that the Society of St. Pius X ( #SSPX ) takes its name from him… it can also be argued that he helped lay the groundwork for the revolution that would follow, not so much by his ideas but by his rather sweeping use of papal authority…One of the most far-reaching things he did had little impact on the average Catholic but it had a dramatic effect on priests, because it made changes to the Breviary, the prayers said by priests each day in the Divine Office (or Liturgy of the Hours). What makes what he did so significant was his use of papal power to rather summarily effect the change, a change that arguably did away with almost 1500 years of tradition, just because he wanted to.… It is this same thinking that would later allow a sweeping change of the Mass to be promulgated in 1970 and for the Old Rite to be ‘abolished’ by judicial fiat of Pope Paul VI…All of this heavy-handed use of papal power ironically had a precedent in Pope St. Pius X…”

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  • “…One of the great strengths of the Catholic religion is its unity and universality, and the concentration of a certain amount of power in the Vatican is one of the things that helps hold it all together. In a world that is increasingly divisive and fragmented this is actually a virtue not a deficit. If the decentralization continues we may well find a church that is even more fragmented and divided than it already is. Take, for example, the different interpretations of the pope’s well meant but ambiguous document on marriage. Bishops in Malta and Argentina said it meant one thing. Bishops in Philadelphia and Nebraska and another in Argentina said it meant something else. If more and more decision making is devolved to local bishops what further confusion and chaos will occur?
    Then there is the general direction this move is taking the church–to a kind of big tent Catholicism which is increasingly similar to Anglicanism…”

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    • This is interesting. So this explains the drawbacks of the Pope’s recent action. What might be an advantage of it?

      • Msgr. Pope explains advantage of NOT having excessive centralized power over such matters: “…Pope St. Pius X looms large as a friend and an image of tradition. He is usually seen as a defender of tradition and a great proponent of what today is called the Extraordinary Form (EF) or Traditional Latin Mass (TLM)—so much so that the Society of St. Pius X (SSPX) takes its name from him. Yet things, people, and movements are seldom as simple as we would like them to be. There are many good reasons for admiring Pope St. Pius X’s attention to the Sacred Liturgy, but it can also be argued that he helped lay the groundwork for the revolution that would follow, not so much by his ideas but by his rather sweeping use of papal authority to influence and change the liturgy in his day. One of the most far-reaching things he did had little impact on the average Catholic but it had a dramatic effect on priests, because it made changes to the Breviary, the prayers said by priests each day in the Divine Office (or Liturgy of the Hours). What makes what he did so significant was his use of papal power to rather summarily effect the change, a change that arguably did away with almost 1500 years of tradition, just because he wanted to.… It is this same thinking that would later allow a s…[Read more]

  • October conference of #traditionalist Catholics (NOT sedevacantists!) in West Virginia, USA. (I disagree with the video’s opening: the Catholic Church is not BECOMING a new religion, since that is impossible—but there certainly are those who wish to make it a new religion. Having the photo of the very-popular heretical Jesuit, James Martin, followed by a photo of St. Maximilian Kolbe sums this up perfectly.)

  • Christopher Schaefer posted an update in the group Group logo of Faith of Our FathersFaith of Our Fathers 2 weeks ago

    Were St. Peter and the Other Apostles Celibate?

  • “…For decades, many Christians have thought it was because the Church was too strict and dogmatic, and if only the Church would lighten up a bit we might attract new #converts . But it hasn’t worked. In fact, it’s had the opposite effect… when we lower our standards, we communicate to people that Christianity isn’t very important – so why should they change their life for it?…Being a Christian isn’t SUPPOSED to be easy..” #Young #Youth

  • Office of Bishop”…One of the seminal events in my life that led me to the Catholic Church was while struggling through the Greek of St. Ignatius of Antioch…reading his letter to the Romans, I became intensely aware of the role of the bishop in the early Church in the person of St. Ignatius…where the bishop is, there is Jesus Christ and his Church. And Ignatius said this not because he was imitating his Lord and Savior by martyrdom in Rome…It is the very #office of the #bishop that is the bearer of the living presence of Christ in His Church. The bishop, the overseer, is the successor the #apostles, and this not merely in a list of names…The bishop is part of and the bearer of the #Tradition of the Church with a capital T. It is not merely that the bishop personifies Jesus Christ for his flock, for this personification is not merely functional, but is by virtue of his ordination, his place in the ordo from the apostles makes him the embodiment of the Tradition of the Catholic Church founded by Christ and the re-presentation of Jesus Christ to his flock.
    This understanding of the bishop in the Church is quite different from the modern conception of the bishop as the CEO of a very old and large corporation…”

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  • “John Calvin described the Sacrifice of the Mass as an ‘abomination unknown to the purer Church,’ and stated that ‘this perverse course was unknown to the purer Church. . . . it is absolutely certain that all antiquity is opposed to them, as . . . may be more surely known by the diligent reading of the Fathers’ (Institutes, IV, 18:9).
    Contrary to Calvin’s puerile, historically revisionist rhetoric, however, there is in fact a great deal of patristic support for the Catholic position on this matter…”

  • Rediscovering the Catholic #Faith in an age that is characterized by lack of clarity, vagueness and obscurity #dogma #doctrine #heresy #Tradition #Modernism #error #magisterium #Catechesis #Evangelization

  • “…The use of salt for religious purposes by the people of God goes back thousands of years to the Jewish people before Christ. And it has been used by Christians since the early Church, especially in the Roman rite. Today, the use of blessed salt in the liturgy is mostly in the Extraordinary Form, especially in exorcisms, baptism, the reconsecration of an altar, and the blessing of holy water. But even in the Ordinary Form, blessed salt may be used in the blessing of holy water.
    Blessed salt is also traditionally used to bless homes. It can be sprinkled, or even laid down in a line, intended to act as a spiritual line of protection against evil spirits…”

  • Christopher Schaefer posted an update in the group Group logo of Faith of Our FathersFaith of Our Fathers 3 weeks ago

    Cardinal #Sarah “…it is not only the world which lives in the frenzy and in the vapid and demagogic discourse. The Church herself, in her doctrinal and moral teaching, lives today in a cacophony, in the confusion of theses, in the duplicity, in the double or triple truth, in an avalanche of interpretations and a pastoral demagogy which one could consider to be a great ecclesiastical disorder…”

  • “…It is also true that we are living in times that have tested many Catholics who have traditionally been the biggest supporters of the #papacy . For many, our current #pope has been a source of controversy rather than unity. And yet the #office endures; it remains our duty to pray for and respect him, and to seek to maintain unity. Concerns for some of his statements should be expressed with charity and manifest good will. Although St. Paul saw fit to express his dismay over some of St. Peter’s prudential decisions (see Gal 2:11), we should remember that St. Paul was a bishop and apostle. Thus Catholics who have concerns today would do well to work with bishops to express their concerns…”

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